Posts Tagged ‘skincare myths’

3 Huge Skincare Myths to Banish Now

Friday, April 10th, 2009

In the quest to get great skin, banish wrinkles, reduce acne, and stay looking young, people will do almost anything from drink mysterious green liquids to buy expensive, exotic products they aren’t sure will work. The good news is getting great skin involves basic things everyone can do like improving your diet, following a skincare routine, and protecting your skin from sun exposure. In the meantime, let’s banish some common myths about skincare so you don’t waste your time and money buying beauty pipe dreams!

Myth #1 - Collagen-infused products help minimize wrinkles


People spend millions of dollars each year on collagen-based products and creams but they are getting taken for a ride. Contrary to popular belief, collagen cannot enter the pores because the actual molecules are not small enough. In order to get any benefit at all, collagen has to be injected under the surface of the skin - so all these creams and lotions are unfortunately a waste. Don’t get taken.

Myth #2 - Unhealthy foods like french fries and chocolate cause breakouts

For years people believed that breakouts and acne were caused by a person’s poor diet, but we’ve found out this is untrue. While eating certain foods can absolutely improve one’s skin, eating french fries won’t necessarily lead to a breakout. If you notice you breakout after eating certain foods, by all means, try cutting them out, but don’t jump to the conclusion that food is the reason for your flare ups.

Myth #3 - Vitamin E is good for reducing scars

Whether it’s scars from acne, chicken pox, or childhood accidents, many people think applying Vitamin E creams and oils to their face and skin will help heal and minimize scars when this is simply NOT the case. The irony is Vitamin E is actually a serious and common skin irritant and can cause horrible allergic reactions in people sensitive to it. If you want to reduce scars, apply healing creams without vitamin E for better results.